Making print more readable

For visually impaired people reading is difficult because the contrast of the print is affected by reduced lighting. Also especially when their macula is involved, they cannot read small print.  Here are some guidelines to making print more accessible especially for students.

Using the highest contrast possible is best.  Use light letters on a dark background or dark letters on a light background. 

It is also preferable to use large print size, from about 16 point or 18 point at the least. 

The Font type should be recognizable characters,  using upper and lower case, avoiding italics, all caps, or slanted print.  Also do not use decorative fonts.  Recommended fonts are arial, verdana, and better if they can be bold.  

It is important to avoid glossy papers as they can cause glare. 

There must be adequate spacing between letters and words.  When the letters are too close to each other, they are especially difficult to read for persons with central field defects.  The recommended spacing between lines of text is 1.5 rather than single space, as recommended by the American Foundation for the Blind.  Also students may use a marker below the line to help them remain in the same line.  

An extra wide binding margin makes it easier to  the use low vision devices such as stand magnifiers and portable videomagnifiers, as it is better to read with these devices on a flat surface.  

Sometimes, all it takes to make life easier in school for students with visual impairment is to make print legible for them.  Simple adjustments can make a difference in a person’s life.

 

 

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